Researching the Lybargers

The information in this site was compiled over the years by me, Jennifer Wilke, a 5x great-granddaughter of Ludwick Lybarger, Sr. (@1735-1827). Primary sources include the detailed records compiled by the Lybarger Memorial Association, by my aunt Nancy Lybarger Rhoades (1915-2007), our Lybarger cousins, visits to Ohio cemeteries, finding the Civil War-era letters and journals of Edwin Lewis Lybarger (1840-1924), and remembering all the family stories and people in dusty framed photographs that sparked my imagination from an early age.

You can click on any photo in the slide show at the top of this site to read a post about Edwin Lybarger’s Civil War experiences as a soldier in the 43rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as well as women’s war efforts on the homefront. In 2009, Ohio University, Swallow Press, published WANTED–CORRESPONDENCE, Women’s Letters to a Union Soldier, co-edited by Nancy L. Rhoades and Lucy E. Bailey. This book was a labor of love for Aunt Nancy, based on the 168 letters she found well-preserved in a trunk in her attic, written by women to Edwin Lybarger while he fought in the Civil War.

As a curious only child, I asked questions and treasured mementos of the past from all the ancestors I never met. The cold and heavy Confederate musket ball my grandfather Harry Swayne Lybarger (1888-1958) put into my palm when I was six. Great-great grandmother Amelia Crum Lybarger’s (1813-1902) green glass pitcher. The pink silk and lace nightcap that my grandmother Ethel Finney Lybarger (1885-1969) carefully packed away long before I was born, with a note written in pencil “For Your Trousseau.” My favorite ancestor, though, is Ludwick Sr., are reportedly large and strong man, who outlived two wives, had 15 children, and lived to be over 90, still with good eyesight and all his own teeth when he died. How would they have known that, unless he’d bragged about it, I wonder?